WHERE KIDS DON'T CRY.
       
     
 There are places where kids should be allowed to complain. And cry.  Makaising is one of them. A small village hidden in the hills that surround the city of Gorkha, about 100kms from the nepalese capital of Kathmandu, Makaising hosts the Chepang, an indigenous tribe considered among the poorest and most marginalised of Nepal. Isolated from the rest of the village, Chepang people live in sheds made of tree branches and metal sheets in very worrying health conditions.  When arrived there to spend three months with them, I was sure to be mentally prepared to what I would have found. Truth is, I wasn’t.  I was used to a world where people have everything but still complain ‘cause they want more, depressed in an endless research of an unreachable happiness. And there I was, landed in a place where food is very limited, water shortage is normality, everyone suffers of skin disease due to lack of hygiene, but I’ve never heard a kid cry. Instead, I’ve been overwhelmed by their smiles.  They did have hunger. Hunger for love. I got to know their names, became one of them, learned to see reality with their eyes. So much simple, basic and yet, happy.  Three months passed by, and I left with tears in my eyes conscious that I learned more than what I taught, received way more than what I gave.
       
     
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WHERE KIDS DON'T CRY.
       
     
WHERE KIDS DON'T CRY.

NEPAL, FEB - APR 2018

 There are places where kids should be allowed to complain. And cry.  Makaising is one of them. A small village hidden in the hills that surround the city of Gorkha, about 100kms from the nepalese capital of Kathmandu, Makaising hosts the Chepang, an indigenous tribe considered among the poorest and most marginalised of Nepal. Isolated from the rest of the village, Chepang people live in sheds made of tree branches and metal sheets in very worrying health conditions.  When arrived there to spend three months with them, I was sure to be mentally prepared to what I would have found. Truth is, I wasn’t.  I was used to a world where people have everything but still complain ‘cause they want more, depressed in an endless research of an unreachable happiness. And there I was, landed in a place where food is very limited, water shortage is normality, everyone suffers of skin disease due to lack of hygiene, but I’ve never heard a kid cry. Instead, I’ve been overwhelmed by their smiles.  They did have hunger. Hunger for love. I got to know their names, became one of them, learned to see reality with their eyes. So much simple, basic and yet, happy.  Three months passed by, and I left with tears in my eyes conscious that I learned more than what I taught, received way more than what I gave.
       
     

There are places where kids should be allowed to complain. And cry.

Makaising is one of them. A small village hidden in the hills that surround the city of Gorkha, about 100kms from the nepalese capital of Kathmandu, Makaising hosts the Chepang, an indigenous tribe considered among the poorest and most marginalised of Nepal. Isolated from the rest of the village, Chepang people live in sheds made of tree branches and metal sheets in very worrying health conditions.

When arrived there to spend three months with them, I was sure to be mentally prepared to what I would have found. Truth is, I wasn’t.

I was used to a world where people have everything but still complain ‘cause they want more, depressed in an endless research of an unreachable happiness. And there I was, landed in a place where food is very limited, water shortage is normality, everyone suffers of skin disease due to lack of hygiene, but I’ve never heard a kid cry. Instead, I’ve been overwhelmed by their smiles.

They did have hunger. Hunger for love. I got to know their names, became one of them, learned to see reality with their eyes. So much simple, basic and yet, happy.

Three months passed by, and I left with tears in my eyes conscious that I learned more than what I taught, received way more than what I gave.

20180228_170751.jpg
       
     
IMG_1039.jpg
       
     
IMG_20180312_221059_513.jpg
       
     
IMG_20180411_002532_632.jpg
       
     
IMG_20180302_171708_469.jpg
       
     
20180404135103_IMG_9098.jpg
       
     
IMG_0296.jpg
       
     
       
     



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IMG_8109 (2).jpg
       
     
IMG_8111 (1).jpg